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Clearing cells to prevent cervical cancer.

A study describes a novel approach to preventing cervical cancer based on findings showing successful reduction in the risk of cervical cancer after removal of a discrete population of cells in the cervix.

The findings come from a study that looked at squamocolumnar junction cells, or SCJ cells. These cells reside in the cervical canal and have been implicated as the origins of cervical cancer. A research team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), demonstrated that removal of SCJ cells resulted in a markedly lower risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-a non-cancerous, abnormal growth of cells on the surface of the cervix that may progress to cervical cancer.

One hundred and thirty-one women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia were treated with a loop electrosurgical excision procedure to remove the SCJ cells. During the follow-up period (of up to four years), 16 recurrences were identified. Four were identified at the first follow-up visit, and determined to be residual disease, meaning they were not removed in the initial procedure. Twelve manifested after the first postoperative visit and all were in the ectocervix or in mature metaplastic epithelium. All of the 12 delayed recurrences were cervical intraepithelial neoplasias and did not have SCJ cells.

The medical community have always suspected that most recurrences following apparently successful therapy do not develop in the same location as the original precancer, which was at the squamocolumnar junction.  Moreover, studies in the literature have shown that the risk of a significant precancer following successful removal is quite low. Our study is in sync with these observations and suggests that removing SCJ cells might have a significant impact in reducing the risk of cervical cancer.

The team emphasizes that eliminating SCJ cells does not prevent cervical intraepithelial neoplasias nor does it prevent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection-which can lead to cervical cancer. But what is significant about the findings, according to the researchers, is that removal of SCJ cells seems to alter recurrence patterns, presumably by removing the population that is most vulnerable to development of the more dangerous precancers.

This is a concept that is in great need of a controlled clinical trial aimed at prevention rather than treatment.  It would give oncologists important insights into whether preemptive removal of the SCJ region would have the desired effect.

Source:  Brigham and Women’s Hospital

 

Immortal HeLa cervical cancer cells in culture.
Immortal HeLa cervical cancer cells in culture.

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An avid campaigner in the fight against child sex abuse and trafficking, Michelle is a passionate humanist striving for a better quality of life for all humans by helping to provide traction for new technologies and techniques within healthcare.

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