Skip to content

‘Rewired’ mice show signs of longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses.

While developing a new cancer drug, researchers at The Wistar Institute discovered that mice lacking a specific protein live longer lives with fewer age-related illnesses. The mice, which lack the TRAP-1 protein, demonstrated less age-related tissue degeneration, obesity, and spontaneous tumour formation when compared to normal mice. Their findings could change how scientists view the metabolic networks within cells.

In healthy cells, TRAP-1 is an important regulator of metabolism and has been shown to regulate energy production in mitochondria, organelles that generate chemically useful energy for the cell. In the mitochondria of cancer cells, TRAP-1 is universally overproduced.  The study, which appears in the journal Cell Reports, shows how ‘knockout’ mice bred to lack the TRAP-1 protein compensate for this loss by switching to alternative cellular mechanisms for making energy.

The researchers observed an astounding change in TRAP-1 knockout mice, where they show fewer signs of aging and are less likely to develop cancers.  The findings provide an unexpected explanation for how TRAP-1 and related proteins regulate metabolism within our cells.  Researchers usually link the reprogramming of metabolic pathways with human diseases, such as cancer.  What the team didn’t expect to see were healthier mice with fewer tumours.

The group created the TRAP-1 knockout mice as part of their ongoing investigation into their novel drug, Gamitrinib, which targets the protein in the mitochondria of tumour cells. TRAP-1 is a member of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) family, which are ‘chaperone’ proteins that guide the physical formation of other proteins and serve a regulatory function within mitochondria. Tumours use HSP90 proteins, like TRAP-1, to help survive therapeutic attack.  In tumours, the loss of TRAP-1 is devastating, triggering a host of catastrophic defects, including metabolic problems that ultimately result in the death of the tumour cells.  Mice that lack TRAP-1 from the start, however, have three weeks in the womb to compensate for the loss of the protein.

The researchers found that in their knockout mice, the loss of TRAP-1 causes mitochondrial proteins to misfold, which then triggers a compensatory response that causes cells to consume more oxygen and metabolize more sugar. This causes mitochondria in knockout mice to produce deregulated levels of ATP, the chemical used as an energy source to power all the everyday molecular reactions that allow a cell to function.

This increased mitochondrial activity actually creates a moderate boost in oxidative stress (‘free radical damage’) and the associated DNA damage. While DNA damage may seem counterproductive to longevity and good health, the low level of DNA damage actually reduces cell proliferation, slowing growth down to allow the cell’s natural repair mechanisms to take effect.

According to the team, their observations provide a mechanistic foundation for the role of chaperone molecules, like HSP90, in the regulation of bioenergetics in mitochondria, how cells produce and use the chemical energy they need to survive and grow. Their results explain some contradictory findings in the scientific literature regarding the regulation of bioenergetics and dramatically show how compensatory mechanisms can arise when these chaperone molecules are taken out of the equation.

The findings strengthen the case for targeting HSP90 in tumour cells, but they also open up a fascinating array of questions that may have implications for metabolism and longevity.  The team predict that the TRAP-1 knockout mouse will be a valuable tool for answering these questions.

Source:  The Wistar Institute

 

TRAP-1 knockout mice have reduced age-associated pathologies.  Loss of TRAP-1 upregulates oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis transcriptomes.  TRAP-1-deleted cells have deregulated mitochondrial respiration and enhanced glycolysis.  TRAP-1 deletion induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and reduced cell proliferation.  Deletion of the Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 Uncovers Global Reprogramming of Metabolic Networks.  Altieri et al 2014.
TRAP-1 knockout mice have reduced age-associated pathologies. Loss of TRAP-1 upregulates oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis transcriptomes. TRAP-1-deleted cells have deregulated mitochondrial respiration and enhanced glycolysis. TRAP-1 deletion induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and reduced cell proliferation. Deletion of the Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 Uncovers Global Reprogramming of Metabolic Networks. Altieri et al 2014.

Healthinnovations View All

Michelle Petersen is the founder of Healthinnovations, having worked in the health and science industry for over 21 years, which includes tenure within the NHS and Oxford University. Healthinnovations is a publication that has reported on, influenced, and researched current and future innovations in health for the past decade.

Michelle has been picked up as an expert writer for Informa publisher’s Clinical Trials community, as well as being listed as a blog source by the world’s leading medical journals, including the acclaimed Nature-Springer journal series.

Healthinnovations is currently indexed by the trusted Altmetric and PlumX metrics systems, respectively, as a blog source for published research globally. Healthinnovations is also featured in the world-renowned BioPortfolio, BioPortfolio.com, the life science, pharmaceutical and healthcare portal.

Most recently the Texas A&M University covered The Top 10 Healthinnovations series on their site with distinguished Professor Stephen Maren calling the inclusion of himself and his team on the list a reflection of “the hard work and dedication of my students and trainees”.

Michelle Petersen’s copy was used in the highly successful marketing campaign for the mega-hit film ‘Jumanji: The Next Level, starring Jack Black, Karen Gilian, Kevin Hart and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson. Michelle Petersen’s copywriting was part of the film’s coverage by the Republic TV network. Republic TV is the most-watched English language TV channel in India since its inception in 2017.

An avid campaigner in the fight against child sex abuse and trafficking, Michelle is a passionate humanist striving for a better quality of life for all humans by helping to provide traction for new technologies and techniques within healthcare.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.