Discovery yields master regulator of toxin production in staph infections.

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are among the most frequently used bac’s in scientific research labs. The ‘grape-shaped’ bacteria have started to develop a biofilm: after they adhere to the surface, S. aureus switches to the biofilm-mode of growth and produces a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The production of a biofilm allows S. aureus to aggregate more easily and makes them increasingly resistant to antibiotics. Credit: Martin Oeggerli 2012.

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The researchers also showed that the same enzyme allows Staphylococcus aureus to use fatty acids acquired from the infected individual to make the membrane that bacteria need to grow and flourish. The results provide a promising focus for efforts to develop a much-needed new class of antibiotics to combat staph and other Gram-positive infections. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of staph infections, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the drug-resistant infection that is a growing problem in hospitals.

The team set out to answer a long-standing question about bacterial membrane biochemistry and discovered a master regulator of the virulence factors that make staph infections so destructive and dangerous. The pathway they have identified offers an exciting new target for antibiotic drug development.

Virulence factors include dozens of proteins that bacteria make and secrete. The factors cause many symptoms and infection-related problems, including destruction of cells and tissue, and evasion of the immune system.

The enzyme Rock and his colleagues discovered is fatty acid kinase (FAK). Researchers showed that FAK is formed by the proteins FakA and FakB1 or FakB2. Scientists demonstrated how FakA and FakB work together to replace fatty acids in the bacterial membrane with fatty acids from the person infected.

Fatty acids are a key component of the phospholipids that make up a significant part of the bacterial membrane. Bacteria produce their own fatty acids, but some, including Staphylococcus aureus, can also borrow from their host, which reduces the demands on bacteria to make their own. Until now, however, the enzyme used to incorporate host fatty acids was unknown.

Researchers showed that different genes carry instructions for making the FAK proteins. Loss of the genes disrupted the ability of bacteria to incorporate host fatty acids into the bacterial membrane.  The big surprise was that loss of these genes also impacted production of virulence factors.  The mutant Staphylococcus aureus did not make the proteins responsible for many of the symptoms caused by these infections.

Earlier research from the lab hinted at a connection between fatty acid synthesis and production of virulence factors, but this study is the first to establish the biochemical link and identify the mechanism involved. Evidence suggests that FAK functions in the transcriptional regulation of virulence factor production, switching on genes that carry instructions for making the proteins.  In fact, FAK’s primary role in bacteria might be as a transcriptional regulator.

Researchers also detailed how FAK handles its duties related to membrane phospholipids. FakA includes the kinase domain, which allows the protein to function as an enzyme. FakB1 binds saturated fatty acids while FakB2 prefers unsaturated fatty acids.

When FakA interacts with either FakB1 or FakB2 a phosphate is transferred onto the FakB fatty acid, producing acyl-phosphate, a chemical intermediate not found in humans. The acyl-phosphate is used as a substitute for fatty acids normally made by the bacteria.

This discovery lays the groundwork for a new class of antibiotics to fight multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and related bacteria that cause serious infections.

Source:  St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

 

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are among the most frequently used bac’s in scientific research labs. The ‘grape-shaped’ bacteria have started to develop a biofilm: after they adhere to the surface, S. aureus switches to the biofilm-mode of growth and produces a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The production of a biofilm allows S. aureus to aggregate more easily and makes them increasingly resistant to antibiotics.  Credit:  Martin Oeggerli 2012.
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are among the most frequently used bac’s in scientific research labs.
The ‘grape-shaped’ bacteria have started to develop a biofilm: after they adhere to the surface, S. aureus switches to the biofilm-mode of growth and produces a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The production of a biofilm allows S. aureus to aggregate more easily and makes them increasingly resistant to antibiotics. Credit: Martin Oeggerli 2012.
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