Skip to content

Harvard-led literature review on genetics in depression, what’s known, what’s next.

Even with modern whole-genome sequencing techniques, it has proven difficult to identify genetic factors affecting risk for depression, according to an opensource literature review in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry.  Given the established heritability of depression, there is every reason to expect that with larger studies the medical community will be able to identify genetic loci.  Identifying ways to generate these larger samples is one of the many challenges before us.

The researchers from Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Virginia Commonwealth University, and the Alpert Brown Medical School review recent findings and future directions in research on the genetics of depression. Depression is one of the most common, disabling, and costly mental health conditions. Understanding its causes, including genetic and environmental factors and the interactions between them, has important implications for prevention and treatment.

Depression is known to run in families. Based on studies of twins, it’s estimated that genetic factors account for about 40 percent of the variation in population risk of depression.

In recent years, techniques such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have accelerated efforts to identify the genetic factors underlying a wide range of diseases. But so far, GWAS of depression have found no associations. The limited success of GWAS in identifying depression-associated genetic variants is in contrast to the results for other psychiatric disorders. For example, studies have identified more than 100 genetic variants for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.  What’s more, genetic factors previously suggested as contributors to depression risk, such as genes affecting dopamine or serotonin neurotransmission, haven’t been confirmed.

Another issue is that GWAS have not as of yet accounted for the role of environment. Studies of gene-by-environment (GxE) look at how genes may modify the effect of environmental factors on depression risk (or vice versa).

A 2003 study suggested an interaction between a gene variant affecting serotonin and stressful life events, for example, childhood maltreatment. Thus far, studies have yielded conflicting results for GxE, while some studies supported this GxE effect, others showed no associations with the serotonin variant. However, other GxE studies have suggested more consistent associations for other genes, including genes involved in regulating the stress response.

The researchers summise that the combination of GWAS and GxE may help yield new insights.  Large-scale GxE studies may lead to new discoveries about the genetic basis of depression.

The researchers discuss the reasons for the lack of success of GWAS and GxE studies, and the many challenges that lie ahead. Because of the complex genetic architecture of depression, very large studies will be needed to detect the individually small contributions of multiple genes. Approaches to account for the multiple types of depression will be needed as well.

Meanwhile, the team believe that research on the genetics of depression is at an exciting, yet challenging crossroad and although the search to identify genes associated with depression has proven challenging, many scientists worldwide are working hard to identify its genetic underpinnings. With this knowledge, the medical community can ultimately help prevent the onset of the disorder and improve the lives of those who already suffer.

Source:  Newswise

 

Genetics in depression - What's known, what's next - neuroinnovations

Healthinnovations View All

Michelle Petersen is the founder of Healthinnovations, having worked in the health and science industry for over 21 years, which includes tenure within the NHS and Oxford University. Healthinnovations is a publication that has reported on, influenced, and researched current and future innovations in health for the past decade.

Michelle has been picked up as an expert writer for Informa publisher’s Clinical Trials community, as well as being listed as a blog source by the world’s leading medical journals, including the acclaimed Nature-Springer journal series.

Healthinnovations is currently indexed by the trusted Altmetric and PlumX metrics systems, respectively, as a blog source for published research globally. Healthinnovations is also featured in the world-renowned BioPortfolio, BioPortfolio.com, the life science, pharmaceutical and healthcare portal.

Most recently the Texas A&M University covered The Top 10 Healthinnovations series on their site with distinguished Professor Stephen Maren calling the inclusion of himself and his team on the list a reflection of “the hard work and dedication of my students and trainees”.

Michelle Petersen’s copy was used in the highly successful marketing campaign for the mega-hit film ‘Jumanji: The Next Level, starring Jack Black, Karen Gilian, Kevin Hart and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson. Michelle Petersen’s copywriting was part of the film’s coverage by the Republic TV network. Republic TV is the most-watched English language TV channel in India since its inception in 2017.

An avid campaigner in the fight against child sex abuse and trafficking, Michelle is a passionate humanist striving for a better quality of life for all humans by helping to provide traction for new technologies and techniques within healthcare.

Leave a Reply

Translate »