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Categorynanotechnology

Stomach acid-powered nanobots get their first test in a living animal.

Researchers at the University of California have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the … Continue Reading Stomach acid-powered nanobots get their first test in a living animal.

First-in-class cancer-specific nanoparticles infiltrate, kill tumour cells from within.

Conventional treatment seeks to eradicate cancer cells by drugs and therapy delivered from outside the cell, which may also affect (and potentially harm) nearby normal cells. In contrast to conventional … Continue Reading First-in-class cancer-specific nanoparticles infiltrate, kill tumour cells from within.

Stanford researchers invent nanotech microchip to diagnose type-1 diabetes.

An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device’s inventors at the Stanford University … Continue Reading Stanford researchers invent nanotech microchip to diagnose type-1 diabetes.

‘Nanojuice’ could improve how doctors examine the gut.

A new imaging technique involving nanoparticles suspended in liquid to form ‘nanojuice’ that patients would drink holds promise for the examination of the gut. Upon reaching the small intestine, doctors would strike the nanoparticles with a harmless laser light, providing an unparalleled, non-invasive, real-time view of the organ. It may help diagnose irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, Crohn’s disease and other gastrointestinal illnesses. Conventional imaging methods show the organ and blockages, but this method allows the medical team to see how the small intestine operates in real time.

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