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Noninvasive, fully-reversible ultrasonic brain stimulation controls monkeys choices.

Seen as a potential breakthrough for many psychiatric illnesses, neuromodulation devices stimulate brain networks to regulate aberrant neural pathways, proffering a more natural and efficacious option for patients. Much excitement … Continue Reading Noninvasive, fully-reversible ultrasonic brain stimulation controls monkeys choices.

First human study targets cortical neurons in the brain to improve motor function.

The spinal cord is extremely vulnerable to injury, however, unlike other parts of the body this extension of the brain does not have the ability to repair itself when damaged. … Continue Reading First human study targets cortical neurons in the brain to improve motor function.

New brain-computer interface restores the sense of touch in the hand of a paralyzed man.

Touch is essential for hand use, however, brain-controlled prosthetic limbs have not been endowed with this critical sense.  Now, a study from researchers at the University of Pittsburgh develops a … Continue Reading New brain-computer interface restores the sense of touch in the hand of a paralyzed man.

Researchers successfully control a cockroach via a brain-to-brain interface.

Researchers from the Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) have achieved allograft control through a ‘brain-to-brain interface’. The team have developed a technique which allowed them to control a living cockroach … Continue Reading Researchers successfully control a cockroach via a brain-to-brain interface.

Researchers identify neural networks within the vagus nerve responsible for breathing.

A precision genetic analysis has yielded a surprising result, a network of neurons control breathing within the vagus nerve. Among these function-specific network of neurons, two types are dedicated to … Continue Reading Researchers identify neural networks within the vagus nerve responsible for breathing.

Deep brain stimulation study is the first to successfully treat swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s disease patients treated with low-frequency deep brain stimulation show significant improvements in swallowing dysfunction and freezing of gait over typical high-frequency treatment. The study, published in Neurology, provides a … Continue Reading Deep brain stimulation study is the first to successfully treat swallowing dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease.