Researchers identify target against MRSA, gram-positive infections using precision genetics.


The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance, when infectious bacteria evolve to evade drugs designed to control them, is a pressing public health concern. Each year two million Americans acquire antibiotic-resistant infections, leading to 23,000 deaths. In light of these unsettling statistics, there has been a call to develop new weapons to combat bacterial threats to human health.

Scientists at the University of Utah and the University of Georgia have uncovered a pharmacological target that could enable development of novel drugs against antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other infectious Gram-positive organisms such as Listeria and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The target was revealed upon discovery of a Gram-positive bacteria-specific pathway for making heme, an essential iron-carrying molecule. The findings were reported in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The therapeutic target could be used to create a completely new class of drugs for fighting Gram-positive bacteria including those that cause antibiotic-resistant infections.

The fortuitous discovery was an outcome of a quest to solve a case of mistaken identity. For the past 100 years, the prevailing notion was that every organism, from bacteria to man, used the same eight-step recipe to make the essential, snowflake-shaped iron transporter, heme. That’s why the team were puzzled when they noticed that proteins that were given the name HemN, a key component of the historically-defined heme pathway, looked very different in Gram-positive bacteria than in other classes of bacteria. The code of amino acids, building blocks of proteins, that were recorded as Gram-positive HemN didn’t match up with the rest.

The team found that the so-called Gram-positive bacteria Heme N was, in fact, incapable of making heme. Determined to figure out what substitutes for HemN the team purified components of the heme pathway in Gram-positive bacteria.  The team collected the intermediates of the heme pathway, and determined that the last three were completely different than expected. Biochemical experiments further showed that a Gram-positive specific enzyme called HemQ is required for the final step. A survey of heme pathway components in over 350 other organisms support the idea that only Gram-positive bacteria use the alternate, HemQ-dependent recipe for making heme.

The team explain that the implications were immediately obvious, a drug that disables HemQ, will knock out heme biosynthesis only in Gram-positive bacteria, sparing this important pathway in human cells. The researchers have already demonstrated that genetically eliminating HemQ severely disables the troublesome germs, suggesting a drug that targets the protein will do the same. If screens against existing compounds identify one that is capable of blocking HemQ, a drug could be available in as quickly as two years; development of a new antibiotic could take ten years.

The team summise that the original goal of this work was to sort out the naming of different bacterial genes, but the result was identifying a completely new metabolic pathway that can be exploited to improve healthcare.  It’s a reminder that, to paraphrase Louis Pasteur, chance favours the prepared mind.

Source:  University of Utah School of Medicine

 

Identification of a Much-Needed Drug Target Against MRSA, Gram-Positive Infections - healthinnovations

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