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Study shows epigenetic changes in children with Crohn’s Disease.

A new study finds  a wide range of epigenetic changes, alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures, in children with Crohn’s disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.  The study provides compelling evidence of alterations of DNA in several regions of the genome in children with CD.  In addition to providing new insights into how genes and the environment interact, the results may have early implications for clinical management of CD.

The researchers performed a genome-wide study in children with newly diagnosed CD, before any treatment, to look for possible epigenetic changes that may affect gene behavior.  Epigenetic changes reflect the impact of a wide range of environmental factors on genes.  The results showed strong evidence of such changes at 65 different sites across the genome.  Nineteen sites showed clustering of epigenetic changes, pointing at genetic pathways that might be relevant to CD development.

Similar patterns were present in a separate group of children who had been treated for CD, as well as in a group of treated adults.

The study highlighted highly significant changes in two specific gene locations (loci), which include genes responsible for immune and cellular functions that could contribute to the development of CD.  Two probes for these loci were highly accurate in predicting which children would have CD, providing a potentially useful biomarker for use as a diagnostic test.

One specific gene location seemed particularly important, as it has been implicated in a number of different cancers, including colorectal cancer.  The same area has a known role in the development of T-cells, a key type of immune cell.  The study also identified a number of other loci that might play a role in the development of CD, warranting further study.

The new research adds to the growing body of evidence of epigenetic changes in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.  The findings highlight the importance of combining information on DNA changes, genes, and gene expression in future studies of these and other complex diseases.

Crohn’s disease is a painful, medically incurable illness that may attack anywhere along the digestive system. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which involves only the large intestine (colon), are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease.  Some 1.4 million American adults and children suffer from CD or ulcerative colitis.

Although much more research is needed to understand the epigenetic changes, the investigators believe their findings could lead to advances in clinical management of childhood-onset CD in the near future.  Here there are exciting and immediate implications for early clinical translation; the discovery of easily accessible biomarkers in peripheral blood to predict disease susceptibility, progression or response to therapy and the potential for new therapeutic targets.

Source:  Wolters Kluwer Health

 

Crohn's disease. Coloured X-ray of the colon (large intestine, red/yellow) of a patient with Crohn's disease. This affects the alimentary canal, resulting in inflammation and ulcers, which gives the colon a ragged appearance, as in the descending colon down far right (yellow). Crohn's disease usually affects the end part of the alimentary canal, resulting in abdominal pain and diarrhoea. The cause is unknown, but is thought to be connected with an infectious agent. Treatment includes rest, changes to the diet and antibiotic and steroid drugs. In severe cases, the affected parts of the intestine may be surgically removed.  Credit: CNRI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY.
Crohn’s disease. Coloured X-ray of the colon (large intestine, red/yellow) of a patient with Crohn’s disease. This affects the alimentary canal, resulting in inflammation and ulcers, which gives the colon a ragged appearance, as in the descending colon down far right (yellow). Crohn’s disease usually affects the end part of the alimentary canal, resulting in abdominal pain and diarrhoea. The cause is unknown, but is thought to be connected with an infectious agent. Treatment includes rest, changes to the diet and antibiotic and steroid drugs. In severe cases, the affected parts of the intestine may be surgically removed. Credit: CNRI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY.

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